If you’re in the unique position of caring for not only your own younger or young adult children, but also your older parents — that makes you a member of the Sandwich Generation. These adults — typically in their 40s or 50s — often juggle working full time with tending to the emotional, financial, and sometimes physical needs of their children and their parents.

These individuals have unique concerns that stem from being “sandwiched” between caring for two distinctly different age groups and are often under a lot of stress. To help bring awareness to the concerns of this generation of dual caregivers, Griswold Home Care has provided a list of resources that speak to the Sandwich Generation. Pick up tips, best practices, and helpful information on multiple aspects of caregiving when you’re stuck in the middle.


Listen to or read a transcript from Griswold’s free webinar that addresses the concerns of members of the Sandwich Generation. Hear from caregivers, educators, and experts in the field about practical, cross-generational strategies for caregiving and pick up a Family Solutions toolkit to help craft a plan for caring for the older members of your family.

The Sandwich Generation — adults stuck in the middle of caring for both young adults and aging parents — are often confronted with several sets of concerns unique to each age group within their family dynamic. This infographic outlines the concerns, needs, and psychological profiles of dual caregivers and their loved ones on either end of the generational spectrum.

It can be difficult enough to manage one household budget, however, adults who belong to the Sandwich Generation are often responsible to manage finances for their own children, as well as their aging parents in their care. Learn strategies and refer to a checklist for planning for your older loved ones on a budget.

For some adults with older parents and young / young adult children at home, it can be stressful to juggle a full-time job with caregiving responsibilities. Learn more about additional home caregiving options for older adults that can help senior loved ones age in place and ease some of the burden on members of the Sandwich Generation.

Learn more about the concerns faced by “dual caregivers” facing middle age, working full time, and caring for their own children, as well as older parents or loved ones. Hear from real people, in their own words, as to some of their biggest fears and needs when it comes to making the transition to caring for multiple generations under one roof.

The term “The Sandwich Generation” gets thrown around a lot when it comes to adults who are caring for both their young or young adult children and their older parents. But beyond that label, who are these people? What is meaningful to them and who comprises their ranks? Take a deeper look at this generation of dual caregivers.