Nearly 1 million Americans are afflicted by strokes each year and it’s the fourth-leading cause of death in the nation. Adding to this alarming statistic, most of the people afflicted with a stroke are over the age of 65. A stroke cuts off the flow of blood and oxygen to the brain, causing damage that spans the gamut from mild to severe.

We’ve collected several informational resources to help you learn more about the warning sign of a stroke, how to act quickly in the event of a stroke, and the difference between ischemic strokes, hemorrhagic strokes, and mini strokes. Check out these resources and learn more about what you can do to help support a stroke victim in your life and give them the care they deserve.

Resources

Stroke Prevention: When Time is of the Essence

When someone you love has a stroke, it’s important to act quickly in order to help increase their chances of recovery. Learn more about warning signs of a stroke what you can do to prepare in the event of a stroke.

Care for Elderly Stroke Patients

Learn more about the FAST method for determining if someone you love has had a stroke and what you can do to make sure they get the help they need immediately. Learn more about the challenging subject of after-stroke care for older adults and support networks that loved ones and caregivers can look to for help.

Stroke Prognosis & Treatment in Elderly Patients

Learn more about the effects of a stroke, different types of stroke, and the prognosis for each. Griswold Home Care offers a number of helpful tips for stroke victims who are recovering and the caregivers who are aiding them through the recovery process.

Stroke Survival, Recovery, and Rehabilitation in the Elderly

Older adults recovering from a stroke often have a long road ahead to recover their ability to speak, regain normal motor function, and even to think and express themselves clearly. Learn more about the special considerations elderly stroke victims may need during their recovery period.

Caring for Stroke Patients At Home

Caregivers and loved ones who make the decision to care for a stroke victim at home may often find themselves frustrated and frazzled. Pick up helpful tips for separating your stricken loved one from some of their new behaviors and help them to gain a better understanding of their situation and the road to recovery ahead.